Tag Archives: Onions

RIO ZAPE BEANS

These dark purple beauties make a wonderful pot liquor. The beans have black stripes on them and are a lighter color before they are cooked. I purchased these beans from www.ranchogordo.com, the company started by Steve Sando that specializes in heirloom new world beans. According to Sando, they are also known as Hopi String Beans and while they are somewhat like pinto beans the Rio Zape beans have a deeper flavor.   CLICK HERE FOR ENTIRE ARTICLE

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MOREL MADNESS

A couple of Saturdays ago my neighbor Ryan dropped in and said that he had gotten some morels at the Farmer’s Market that morning and asked if I had any suggestions about how to prepare them. I, too, had found some at the market that morning and was thinking of what would be the best way to show off the morels. It seemed natural to combine them with pasta and we checked a few cookbooks to see how other people prepared morels.

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LENTIL-WALNUT PATE ON RYE BREAD

This is so good and such a surprise. I came across a recipe for this in Joanne Stepaniak’s Vegan Deli: Wholesome Ethnic Fast Food, Book Publishing Company, Summertown, Tennessee 2001. I grew up in Brooklyn and moved to Southern California with my family when I was a teenager. Deli food was a regular part of the diet in my family. I loved the flavors of all those rich and garlicky and vinegary foods and still do. I regularly ate liverwurst as a child and I remember when I first had chopped liver as an appetizer when I was about seven or eight. I loved it. Nevertheless, I hadn’t had chopped liver for many, many years and so when I found this and tried some, all the memories of all the delicatessens I had been to in my life came rushing back. Much to my surprise a cursory search of the internet revealed many variations on this theme. I couldn’t believe that I hadn’t come across this before.
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WINTER SQUASH WITH MUSHROOM STUFFING AND CRANBERRY MOSTARDA

This is a dish for special occasions, especially when served with Apple-Walnut Salad with Honey Mustard vinaigrette. Some warm rolls and chilled dry Prosecco (or hard cider) will complete the meal. This is my go-to recipe when I want to make something a little fancier than usual for a holiday meal in winter. This recipe makes two generous servings and can be easily multiplied for more servings. It is even more celebratory with gingerbread cake for dessert. The cranberry mostarda can be made the day before as can the gingerbread cake. Also, the vegetables can be cut up ahead of time to make it a little easier.
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TOFU SCRAMBLE

Tofu Scramble for breakfast gives you enough energy to go for almost six hours. Since most of us don’t have time in the morning to slice and sauté vegetables, it helps to do the slicing and sautéing the night before. In the morning you can put the cooked veg in a pan with a little liquid and once they start to get warm add the drained and crumbled tofu and within minutes you have a hot, long-lasting breakfast to get you through most of your day.

This recipe calls for four to five cups of sliced or diced vegetables per seven ounces of firm tofu (one-half of a 14-15 ounce container.) You can always use more tofu if you prefer. Toppings include sweet potato fries or hash brown potatoes. I keep bags of both of these items in my freezer. Put an appropriate amount on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper, put the pan in a 425 degree oven and they will be done by the time you finish the scramble.
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WINTER SQUASH SOUP

This thick and creamy soup is delicious. The chili powder gives the soup a scarlet glow and the heat of the chili contrasts with the sweet Pear, Walnut & Thyme Conserve that is added to the soup.  I grew Buttercup squash this past summer and used some of those squash in this recipe. You can also use Butternut or even Acorn squash. This recipe makes four very generous servings.

I adapted this recipe from Eugenia Bone’s wonderful cookbook, Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Food, Clarkson Potter/Publishers, New York 2009 to make it completely oil-free and plant-based.
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MUSHROOM SOUP

This earthy soup is very satisfying. It is especially satisfying when the weather turns colder and you want something to warm you. Here potatoes and rutabaga, which provide some depth to the flavor of the soup, are cooked in the stock and then pureed. To maximize the flavor of the mushrooms, they and the onions are sauteed with wine before being added to the soup.
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