Tag Archives: Tomatoes

TOFU SCRAMBLE PROVENCAL

A few nights ago while rummaging through Waverly Root’s book, The Food of France, first published in 1958, I came across a description of a dish frequently made in Provence, specifically the city of Arles. It consisted of eggs scrambled with garlic and the inside of a zucchini. Then the mix was put inside the hollowed-out zucchini and topped with some tomato sauce. It sounded pretty good to me. The next day I was in my garden and found a fairly large cocozelle (very similar to zucchini but stronger tasting). I immediately thought about Root’s description of the stuffed squash. I thought that it might work as a tofu scramble.

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TOFU SCRAMBLE

Tofu Scramble for breakfast gives you enough energy to go for almost six hours. Since most of us don’t have time in the morning to slice and sauté vegetables, it helps to do the slicing and sautéing the night before. In the morning you can put the cooked veg in a pan with a little liquid and once they start to get warm add the drained and crumbled tofu and within minutes you have a hot, long-lasting breakfast to get you through most of your day.

This recipe calls for four to five cups of sliced or diced vegetables per seven ounces of firm tofu (one-half of a 14-15 ounce container.) You can always use more tofu if you prefer. Toppings include sweet potato fries or hash brown potatoes. I keep bags of both of these items in my freezer. Put an appropriate amount on a cookie sheet covered with parchment paper, put the pan in a 425 degree oven and they will be done by the time you finish the scramble.
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THREE SISTERS CHILI

Beans, squash and corn are the three sisters,  the main agricultural crops of many  Native American people. Combined with four different peppers, cumin, sage and oregano, they create a deeply flavored, satisfying dish. While looking for a great plant-based chili recipe, I was inspired by the essays and recipes in Fernando and Marlene Divina’s wonderful book, Foods of the Americas: Native Recipes and Traditions (Ten Speed Press, 2004). When I first developed this recipe I was still using canned beans but I have since changed my ways and now I use those delicious Rio Zape beans from Rancho Gordo. I also added roasted sweet red peppers. I like this version better. This recipe uses masa harina, which is cornmeal processed with lime juice and it has a distinctive flavor. If masa harina is unavailable plain fine cornmeal can be substituted. This recipe looks long and complicated but it goes together easily.

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RIBOLLITA

This vegetable soup with kale, Ribollita,  is one of a number of thick soups from Italy served with a slice of bread in the bottom of the bowl. It has  no additional pasta or rice. The name Ribollita means reboiled.  Traditionally the soup was made by heating  leftover vegetable soup in an earthenware pot in the oven. This recipe was inspired by the comprehensive Italian cookbook, The Silver Spoon, Phaidon Press, 2005. As with most plant-based recipes, the method of cooking the vegetables is crucial to obtaining the deepest, richest flavor for the dish. In this recipe, some of the vegetables are sautéed in wine before they go into the stock. These caramelized vegetables  provide a contrast with the sharper kale and tomatoes in the stock.

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