Tag Archives: Walnuts

APPLE WALNUT CELERY SALAD WITH HONEY MUSTARD VINAIGRETTE

This is my favorite combination of ingredients for salad. I use the best flavored apples that I can find. I am partial to butter lettuce because it contrasts with the crunchy ingredients and is a good foil for the vinaigrette, but any favorite will do. I make this salad all year long to serve with lots of different dishes but it seems to have an affinity for dishes made with root vegetables.   CLICK HERE FOR THE ENTIRE ARTICLE 

LENTIL-WALNUT PATE ON RYE BREAD

This is so good and such a surprise. I came across a recipe for this in Joanne Stepaniak’s Vegan Deli: Wholesome Ethnic Fast Food, Book Publishing Company, Summertown, Tennessee 2001. I grew up in Brooklyn and moved to Southern California with my family when I was a teenager. Deli food was a regular part of the diet in my family. I loved the flavors of all those rich and garlicky and vinegary foods and still do. I regularly ate liverwurst as a child and I remember when I first had chopped liver as an appetizer when I was about seven or eight. I loved it. Nevertheless, I hadn’t had chopped liver for many, many years and so when I found this and tried some, all the memories of all the delicatessens I had been to in my life came rushing back. Much to my surprise a cursory search of the internet revealed many variations on this theme. I couldn’t believe that I hadn’t come across this before.
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SEVEN GRAINS WITH SWEET POTATO AND WALNUTS

Plenty of energy in this breakfast bowl. Seven grains (hard red wheat, oat groats, triticale, barley, rye, soft white wheat and spelt) along with some flax seed are mixed with roasted sweet potato, walnuts, nut milk and some sweetener for a delicious, hot cereal. Wheat Montana Farms and Bakery 7-Grain Cereal is a great product. Check out www.wheatmontana.com for store locations and distributors. Bob’s Red Mill has a five-grain cereal if you can’t find Wheat Montana Farm and Bakery products.
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WINTER SQUASH SOUP

This thick and creamy soup is delicious. The chili powder gives the soup a scarlet glow and the heat of the chili contrasts with the sweet Pear, Walnut & Thyme Conserve that is added to the soup.  I grew Buttercup squash this past summer and used some of those squash in this recipe. You can also use Butternut or even Acorn squash. This recipe makes four very generous servings.

I adapted this recipe from Eugenia Bone’s wonderful cookbook, Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Food, Clarkson Potter/Publishers, New York 2009 to make it completely oil-free and plant-based.
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PEAR, WALNUT AND THYME CONSERVE

In the late summer and early fall when the pears come into season here in Western Montana, one of the things I like to do with them is make this conserve. I have an old Barlett pear tree in the back yard and I use those pears. Bosc or Anjou pears also would work very well.

This recipe is based on one developed by Eugenia Bone for her book, Well Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods, Clarkson Potter/Publishers, New York 2009. I adapted Eugenia Bone’s recipe to include dry sherry, walnuts and dark raisins and added some orange zest because that is what I usually have in the pantry.
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ORANGE SPICED NUTS

Especially good with a glass of something in the late afternoon or after dinner, these easy-to-make spiced nuts are better than anything available at the store. I  was inspired by Ina Garten’s take on spiced nuts and came up with the following recipe.  I like it with Harvest Legacy, an apple brandy blended with cider that is made by Swanson’s Mountain View Distillery in the Bitterroot Valley.  Look for something similar in your area.

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FIG AND OLIVE TAPENADE

This wonderful tapenade of sweet figs,  savory olives and vinegary capers is an outstanding blend of sweet and sour/tart and it is hard to stop eating it. It is always a hit. Tapenade goes back to Roman times and can be made many different ways. This recipe featuring figs mixed with the olives and capers is one of my favorites.  There are many recipes for this Provencal dish, with or without the green olives and capers. Jacques Pepin adds the  green olives and capers to his, so I did too. In fact, the name tapenade comes from the Provencal word for capers. It is important to crush the rosemary and thyme if using home-dried and cook them with the figs because otherwise the herbs resemble miniature pieces of wood. Also, crushing releases fragrant oils.

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